Industry News

Rice Receives Commodity Specific Exemptions in State Wetlands Definition, Dredge and Fill Procedures. No changes to Crop Conversion

Rice Receives Commodity Specific Exemptions in State Wetlands Definition, Dredge and Fill Procedures. No changes to Crop Conversion

As a result of months of close work with the State Water Resources Control Board, rice (and wild rice) growers have received commodity specific exemptions in the newly adopted Wetlands Definition and Dredge and Fill Procedures. The language covers rice and wild rice production, and cultural practices associated with production, while designating rice fields as a water of the state. Importantly, rice fields have not been assigned a Wildlife Beneficial Use, or any other beneficial use designation, which would have had significantly impacted voluntary habitat practices undertaken by the industry.

In the approved regulation, cropping changes are allowed on prior converted cropland and wetlands that are, or have been, in rice or wild rice production within the last five years and have not been abandoned due to five consecutive years of non-use in rice production. This provision is of great concern to the environmental interests, and it is expected that the issue of crop conversion may be taken up in future review and updates of the regulation.

The CRC will work with our legal counsel to provide additional information about conversion of croplands under current state and federal regulations.

More Industry News Stories

tractor at sunset

Thiobencarb Management Calendar

The information in this twelve-month chart is just a snapshot of the management necessary to maintain thiobencarb. At the CRC, we work to provide information on the management practices, stewardship updates and the monitoring results because product maintenance does not end with the last application, cumulation of all water-holds or the collection of the final water sample. Every person using, applying and recommending thiobencarb takes ownership in successful management of the herbicide. Management requires constant diligence and coordination with the growers, registrants, pilots, applicators, pest control advisers, county agricultural commissioners and state regulators to assure continual usage of this important herbicide. 

READ MORE