Industry News

Updated Leaf Color Chart is in the Mail

Updated Leaf Color Chart is in the Mail

Remember the leaf color chart (LCC) created by Cass Mutters in 2000? You will receive an update of the original tool in the mail. Both the old and new LCC accurately provide measurements for determining the percentage of leaf nitrogen during the plant growth stage.

We demonstrated the functionality of the LCC to state officials at the regional and state water boards. Simplicity and effectiveness of the LCC won over the regulatory agencies during approval of the Rice Waste Discharge Requirements (Rice WDR) Order. The LCC was one of many tools resulting in a reduction of the Rice WDR reporting and regulatory requirements.

The updated LCC is considered an educational component of the Rice WDR. Please use this tool for applying nitrogen to your rice crop. While the rice growing region of the Sacramento Valley is considered to be low vulnerability from nitrogen usage, adherence to best management practices is essential.

Cass Mutters developed the LCC for the University of California Cooperative Extension with funding from the California Rice Research Board and the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Please use the LCC, or share if you already have the newer version. The LCC shows the rice industry continues to be proactive by staying ahead of ever evolving regulation.

For more information, here’s a link to an article on the LCC in Rice Farming Magazine.

 

Photo courtesy University of California

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